Modern Kung fu

Total Combat!

Ethan Willis-Great Author and Warrior

Ethan Willis was about 14yrs old when I knew him. Even then this young( Willis trained) fighter had and appears all the attributes of a great warrior– smarts, strength, endurance, explosive power, personal drive, willingness to work hard Read this Martial arts blog about Ethan Willis

July 17, 2008 Posted by | devin willis, Ethan Willis, Prosper Learning | , , , | 6 Comments

Shuai Chaio and Chin NA In MKF

According to Devin Willis , “..Master David Lee was taught Shuai Chaio(Shuai Jiao), not Akido It also had entailed Chin Na. also, we were taught to also had strike as we to enter. In Shuai Chaio the main goal is to throw the opponent hard, at a very akward angles, and possibly breaking something along the way of the throw.

I was taught by my Instructor that Shuai-chiao was used by the bodyguards to the chinese emporers.

Our “drills”consited of full contact sparing , with the understanding a takedown was considered any part
of the body, other than the feet, touching the ground. You only got points for a clean throw, you had to remain on your feet and couldn’t be dragged down as well.

Also, once the two competitors “locked up” or made physical contact to initiate/repel, resist, we were given 4 count, if noone had been thrown the competitors were
seperated thus you had to go for the quick clean throw.

Many of the throws are similar to Judo, but sacracfice techniques are not used in sport version of Shuai Chaio (since whoever hits the ground first loses points). It is also illegal in sport Shuai Jiao to throw opponents with techniques that lock the joints.However , used Chin na and worked with joint locks..”
But in It is also illegal in street Shuai Chaio to throw opponents with techniques that lock the joints to break as they are thrown is  the version taught in MKF.

Resource:

Modernkungfu.wetpaint.com

http://tinyurl.com/ywpdup

April 19, 2008 Posted by | david lee, devin willis, History of Modern kung fu, MKF Ranges, MKF Take downs and Throws, systems used | , , , , , | 6 Comments

Ed Parker’s Kenpo VS Modern Kung Fu

Ed Parker (March 19, 1931–December 15, 1990) was an American martial artist and teacher. He is perhaps most famous as the founder of American Kenpo.

Parker was born in Hawaii and raised a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He began his training in the martial arts at a young age in judo and later boxing. Some time in the 1940s, Ed Parker was first introduced to Kenpo by Frank Chow. After some time Frank Chow introduced Ed Parker to William K. S. Chow. Mr. Parker trained with William Chow, while serving in the Coast Guard and attending Brigham Young University. In 1953 that he was promoted to the rank of black belt by William K.S. Chow.

By 1956, Mr. Parker opened his Dojo in Pasadena, California. His first black belt student was Charles Beeder. The other black belts in chronological order up to 1962 were: James Ibrao, Rich Montgomery, Rick Flores, Al and Jim Tracy of Tracy Kenpo, Chuck Sullivan, John McSweeney, and Dave Hebler. In 1962 one of Mr. Parker’s black belts, John McSweeney, opened a school in Ireland, which enabled Mr. Parker to create the International Kenpo Karate Association.

Devin And Ed Parker

Devin And Ed Parker


Devin Willis was raised in South Pasadena and Pasadena, California. a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mr.Willis’s Family and The Parker family have known each other for years, starting as a little boy and then gowing into a man. He knew Mr Parker , simply as Brother Parker and had the fortune of discussing the martial arts and self defense. Mr Willis knew Ed Parker Jr and Sister Parker and loved the family.

One of the reasons I had to leave Devin because of his religion of Mormonism, His Instructor Don Neal was a Lay Pastor and my current instructor is also a Christian(what is a Christian?.)

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

May 20, 2007 Posted by | American Kenpo., devin willis, ed parker, History of Modern kung fu, Mormon, systems used | , , , | 11 Comments