Modern Kung fu

Total Combat!

Defensive Tactics and Modern Kung Fu

Devin Willis taught Security and protection agents, how to survive if they had to defend themselves. I was there during his classes, most of the time being there “dummy”. Below are a very basic thought process of Devin. .

There is a difference between martial arts and Defensive Tactics- do not get me wrong , I love them both and think both have uses. Let me share my humble opinion.

Defensive Tactics– Must Emphasize speed, simplicity and effectiveness. can not take years to perfect.It MUST focus is on real world self-defense (real cases of violence against agents or officers) empty-hand tactics, striking tactics, handcuffing, baton tactics, Person searches, falling and ground tactics, edged weapon , Tear gas tactics, handgun retention or handgun disarming, armed attacks etc

Some exampes are located at – Defensive tactics courses

Certified Defensive Tactics Courses Modern Warrior

Martial Arts- Which I love as well;0) but takes time to learn and practice, most of us while practicing M.A do not worry about a handgun being strapped to our hip or ankle.

We do not worry about rolling around on the ground with a guy hyped on drugs reaching for the gun. While trying to punch you in the face.

With that said I do think after years of study and working out in the field you will learn quickly what will work and what will not and become effective at protecting yourself.

Please refer to:

Use of Force Tactics and No lethal Weapons, paper published by Americans for Effective in Law Enforcement, in 1988.

Non-lethal Weapons: A Survey of Officers, published by Defensive Tactics Newsletter in Lakeland, FL: ISC Division of Wellness, in April 1993, vol. II, number 4;
USE-OF-FORCE TACTICS AND NON-LETHAL WEAPONRY

The sad truth  officers and protection agents must pay out of their own pocket to get great training. Most departments/clients do not have it in the budget.
This is Based on recording and notes  from Devin Willis 1991 class and a fourm notes  he had had posted

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May 29, 2007 Posted by | Defensive Tactics, devin willis | , | 2 Comments

Ed Parker’s Kenpo VS Modern Kung Fu

Ed Parker (March 19, 1931–December 15, 1990) was an American martial artist and teacher. He is perhaps most famous as the founder of American Kenpo.

Parker was born in Hawaii and raised a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He began his training in the martial arts at a young age in judo and later boxing. Some time in the 1940s, Ed Parker was first introduced to Kenpo by Frank Chow. After some time Frank Chow introduced Ed Parker to William K. S. Chow. Mr. Parker trained with William Chow, while serving in the Coast Guard and attending Brigham Young University. In 1953 that he was promoted to the rank of black belt by William K.S. Chow.

By 1956, Mr. Parker opened his Dojo in Pasadena, California. His first black belt student was Charles Beeder. The other black belts in chronological order up to 1962 were: James Ibrao, Rich Montgomery, Rick Flores, Al and Jim Tracy of Tracy Kenpo, Chuck Sullivan, John McSweeney, and Dave Hebler. In 1962 one of Mr. Parker’s black belts, John McSweeney, opened a school in Ireland, which enabled Mr. Parker to create the International Kenpo Karate Association.

Devin And Ed Parker

Devin And Ed Parker


Devin Willis was raised in South Pasadena and Pasadena, California. a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mr.Willis’s Family and The Parker family have known each other for years, starting as a little boy and then gowing into a man. He knew Mr Parker , simply as Brother Parker and had the fortune of discussing the martial arts and self defense. Mr Willis knew Ed Parker Jr and Sister Parker and loved the family.

One of the reasons I had to leave Devin because of his religion of Mormonism, His Instructor Don Neal was a Lay Pastor and my current instructor is also a Christian(what is a Christian?.)

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

May 20, 2007 Posted by | American Kenpo., devin willis, ed parker, History of Modern kung fu, Mormon, systems used | , , , | 11 Comments

Master David Lee

In San Jose, California during the early 1970s a method of combat by the name of Modern Kung Fu which also means “New Hard Task” or “New Work”. The founder name was Master David Lee.

Master Lee had studied many different systems of martial arts in China starting as a very young boy. Some were Pa kua chang, China’s wrestling, Shaolin (martial arts) Hung Gar, Monkey, Eagle Claw, Crane, Drunken Monkey, Tiger, Mantis.

The Main goal in MKF as in most styles of martial arts is to become a better human being. MKF is for defense of different zones, 1-5 the Modern Kung-Fu community utilizes the following breakdown grappling range, trapping range, punching range, and kicking range. Names are merely labels, though. In punching range, you can punch if you would like, or you might do anything else (such as an eye-strike) that would work efficiently within that range. The number of categories that is used is also optional.

In MKF, is known for its ability to adapt to different attacks and defense. The goal of a student is that he/she can defend themselves from any position. This system does not believe in any set techniques, instead it holds to studying movement of the human body

May 20, 2007 Posted by | david lee | 7 Comments

Combat Hapkido or Willis COMBATIVES

I found it interesting Devin Willis write the following:

“…I enjoyed training in this system for a short time, due a switch in job times . My understanding is that In 1990 Grandmaster John Pellegrini officially named his style of Hapkido “Combat Hapkido”.however it had been taught unofficially for many years The name clearly identifies it and sets it apart from other “traditional” styles of Hapkido. It is also referred to as the “Science of Self Defense”. In 1999 the Combat Hapkido System was officially recognized and accredited as a legitimate “Kwan” of Hapkido by the WKF/KKA (Kido-Hae). The Korean name of Combat Hapkido is “Chon-Tu Kwan Hapkido”.

Combat Hapkido is an extremely realistic and versatile discipline of self protection that includes an extensive variety of strikes, kicks, joint locks, pressure points, grappling and disarming techniques.

It is ideal for men , women, busy professionals and law enforcement officers who do not have the time, desire or ability to commit themselves to the demanding study of a traditional Martial Art.

This system is dedicated to about what works on the street in “close quarters” combat situations –

-There are no forms (Kata/Hyungs).and all kicks are directed to the lower part of the body.

-It does not teach “acrobatic” kicks.

-Combat Hapkido employs breakfalls and throws in a very effective manner. It has no hard blocks or stances.

-Combat Hapkido does not teach “Traditional” weapons rather it teaches firearms as well as edged and blunt weapons disarming movements.

-Combat Hapkido has a complete Ground Grappling program.

-This shows me that Devin continues to grow  and  is “.. flexible and eclectic, continues to evolve…”

International Modern Hapkido Federation

More About Combat Hapkido

 

May 20, 2007 Posted by | Combat Hapkido, devin willis | , | 3 Comments

Double Leg Takedown

This was a take down We used to drill over and over:Mr Devin Willis would

Here’s a nice step-by-step illustration. on  Lockflow.com This was a take down We used to drill over and over:Mr Devin Willis would 

 STEP 2 they talk about changing elevation, or more commonly known as a level change. Very important – Bend at the knees, not your back. And dont lead with your face. His posture is excellent.

However, take a look at his right leg. That forward step should actually as deep between his opponents legs as possible. More on this in step 3.

STEP 3 shows your position as you make contact. Kale has his left hand behind the knee, and the right hand is around his partners waist. This is text book positioning. BUT…

Remember my comment about taking that big step as far as possible between your opponents legs? Here’s why…

If you step deeply between the legs when you make contact you will unbalance your opponent, making the takedown easier. The initial “bump” is very important. And when you make contact, you should still be driving forward.

In STEPS 4 and 5 , Kale completes the shoot by continuing to bring the left foot foward and turning the corner (STEP 5). And as you can see, in STEP 6 the takedown is complete.

In STEP 5 Kale could have done a pick up and slam, but that requires more power than turning the corner. I personally prefer turning the corner rather then a pick up.

 Also  make  penetration into a  leg as well. If it falls short is when we worry about stepping around with the outside leg for a hook to take him backwards or a base to dump him sideways. A good, deep step initially will make everything a lot easier

Devin believed  wrestler cannot run as fast or move as fast on his knees, butt, back, sides etc. as he can while he is on his feet. Shooting takedowns and staying on your knees will stop your motion. he was not saying you should not shoot to your knees. However, don’t stay there if you cannot finish quickly while there. Learn to hit on the knee and get off of it quickly or work on your takedown technique by not going to your knees. We found we had more success by not allowing our wrestlers to go to their knees on double leg and single leg takedowns. Their technique for the setups and penetration was much better by doing this. We did allow them to go to their knees while doing fireman’s carries.  see- TheMat.com 

May 20, 2007 Posted by | Double Leg Takedown | 1 Comment

Modern Kung Fu Instructor Defends Knife Class

ORGANISERS of a martial arts class due to take place in Newry next month claim to offer training in knife fighting and boast that their “fighting arena is the pavement, the pub or the night club where there is (sic) no referees”.
Source: True Self Defense
May 05, 2007 08:48:09
 

(PRLog.Org)However, the instructor, James Berrry, has insisted that he will not be teaching people to be aggressive but rather how to defend themselves in what he describes as an increasingly violent world.

The class, which is due to take place in Sports Centre on May 16, is being run by the True Self Defense, an organisation set up by Mr James Berrry and which already runs clubs in Newcastle and Downpatrick.

According to planned advertisement, the association will be teaching various forms of martial arts, some of which involve fighting with knives or sticks, although Mr Berrry says the emphasis will be on disarming an attacker rather than using a weapon yourself. It also promises students the opportunity to Learn Modern Kung Fu

He was taught by Devin Willis, who has his instructors ranking in MKF and Willis Modern Combatives . Devin Willis has been training in the martial arts since he was eight years old and has followed that path for over thirty years. He has taught nureous students over the years ncluding law enforcement, military personal

According to James Berrry and others Mr.Willis is an graduate of Executive Security International, ESI, Advanced Executive Protection Program, Certified Protection Specialist and Certified Security Specialist and has taught the skills used as a bodudyguard to his Instructors

May 5, 2007 Posted by | Modern Kung Fu Instructor Defends Knife Class | Leave a comment

Grapplers Unite Tournament Results

 One of Devin Willis Students  was involved with Grapplers Unite(2005). It looks like he may have changed the system from MKF to Willis Combatives.  My contact here in Caifornia say’s this guy Aaron Peterson trained with Devin and Damon willis only five months(not bad, if true)They are good teachers, but Peterson must have had  talent before meeting them

Richard Lundell President of Grapplers Unite is explained that Grapplers Unite Grappling Submission Tournament was held  in Utah May 21st 2005. see Sherdog

They stated  ‘..We are expecting over 350 competitors to show from all over the West Coast.
We have personally contacted every listed school on the West Coast. This tournament is the biggest tournament to ever come to Utah. Do not miss the opportunity to compete in a much larger scale event. ..”

Novice Heavy: 1. Jarrett Kelton- Mori Academy

2. Mat Landheim-

3. Aaron Peterson- Willis Combatives

4. Clinton Curtis- Mori Academy

Novice Absolute: 1. Jarrett Kelton- Mori Academy

2. Mat Landheim-

3. Aaron Peterson- Willis Combatives

4. Chris Emling- Pedro Sauer BJJ

May 5, 2007 Posted by | Grapplers Unite Tournament Results | Leave a comment

Sanshou + Modern Kung Fu?

I had studied Sanshou or Sanda for over 15 years and Devin threw me aouound like a baby.which is humbling-Sanshou modern Chinese hand to hand combat, self-defense system, and combat sport. Rather seen as an independent style it is consider just one of the components of chinese martial arts and is normally taught alongside other wushu.

The term Sanda has a longer history and is more commonly used. Sanshou was the official name given to the martial art when it was formalized and standardized by the Chinese government. Later the official name reverted back to Sanda.

It is composed of some aspects of traditional martial arts fighting styles in China, but mainly based on scientific one on one combat efficiency. Sanshou is composed of chinese martial arts applications inculding most aspects of combat including striking and grappling. Sanda tournaments are one of the two sport wushu disciplines recognized by the International Wushu Federation

As an unarmed self-defense system, Sanshou includes punches, kicks and grappling (throws, locks, chokes)

Mr. Devin Willis seems to use a more effective Sanshou-He just called MKF

Some Sanda (Sanshou) fighters who are well-known in the U.S.A. include the IKF champion Cung Le, Rudi Ott, and Marvin Perry. Some well-known Sanda fighters within China itself include Yuan Yubao and Liu Hailong who was once called “The Conqueror of Muay Thai”.

May 3, 2007 Posted by | david lee, devin willis, MKF Ranges, Sanshou | , , , , , | 5 Comments

Modern Kung Fu(systems used)

Kosho Shorei Ryu
Kosho Ryu is an ancient art form founded in about 1245 AD by a monk. Legend has it that this stranger meditated under an old pine tree and discovered the meaning of true self-defense. Self-Defense with no body contact is the highest physical art. Kosho Ryu artists learn to move such that opponents cannot see, feel or hear them. By manipulating the attacker perception of their environment, they are able to control their movements, force and aggression. Today the temple still stands strong in Japan as it did centuries ago. However, there is no practice of Kosho Ryu at the temple at present, as the monks spend most of their time with their religious practices. The most apparent reminder of the past is an old plaque found on the temple grounds dedicated to the monk.
The direct translation of Kosho Ryu is “the study of natural laws”, “the way of enlightenment” through motion and movement. There is no other art like Kosho Ryu. It is not a “style” or “system” but rather an understanding or process. It is a study of the natural law of motion and movement. The student learns that all the seemingly diversified art forms function by the same set of natural laws and principles. In doing so, the student learns to accept and deal with life as it is and not how they wish it to be. Kosho is about the process of study. Its combative arts are devastatingly effective but only represent a part of what Kosho Ryu is all about. The art form builds healthy character and allows the student to expand their abilities beyond expectations.

Kosho Ryu students learn to pay attention to their environment and to themselves. As a result of this natural law approach, the principles of Kosho can easily be integrated with any art. These principles will lend new insights and a quantum leap in understanding to even the advanced practitioners of martial arts.

Material taught in the Kosho Ryu curriculum include the understanding of prepratory arts, human body and its systems, restorative arts, escaping arts, healing arts, weaponry, philosophy, internal arts, weaponless forms of self defense.

Kosho Ryu is more than just a fighting art, it is a way of life complete with a socially significant philosophy that is capitalized in the term “self-defense”. Only in the most extreme situations of life threading aggression are the fighting aspects of the art brought into play. The fighting arts themselves are designed to bring the opponent to the awareness of their wrong doing rather than to harm them. Kosho Ryu is the development of restraint, propriety, humbleness and integrity.

from http://www.usadojo.com

Arnis / Kali / Escrima
Arnis began in the Philippines over 1200 years ago. It was the fighting technique used against the Spaniards in the 1500’s. Today Arnis is the main martial art in the Philippines and defiantly the most popular. Modern Arnis was developed and refined by Remy Presas. The word Arnis is taken from the term “Arnis de mano” or harness of the hand. Arnis (practiced in northern Philippines), Kali (practiced in the southern Philippines) and Escrima (practiced in central Philippines) are all essentially the same art.

Arnis practitioners utilize empty hand techniques and weapons such as sticks and knives. There are different forms of combat which use different types of weapons such as a long wooden sword and a short wooden dagger. There is a single stick and double stick Arnis which uses one or two 2 foot long stick(s) made of wood or cane.

Arnis is a serious form of self defense but it is often seen as a sport. It uses almost all hand techniques, striking and parrying and depends strongly on strategy. Students train with drills, sparring and in free style practice and the training is very physical and strenuous.

Arnis practitioners also develop mental, emotional and spiritual qualities.

from http://www.usadojo.com

American Kenpo
A style of Karate developed in the West. It deviates from traditional Karate in several important respects. First, the terms used are in language of the country in which it is being taught. Japanese is not the language of instruction. Also, students are encouraged to change and adapt the techniques. The school emphasizes vital point attacks using punches, strikes and kicks. Throws are also important. The art was original introduced in Hawaii by James Mitose, near the start of World War II. Later, William Chow, one of his students, adapted Mitose’s approach and “Americanized” the art. Ed Parker, who is probably the most famous practitioner, was a student of Chows and further adapted the methods so that they would prove practical in an actual fight. He created a logical organization for the basic Kenpo techniques, dividing them into eight categories., such as stances, blocks, punches and so on. These are taught in forms, in self-defense practice, and in free-style sparring. (From The Martial Arts Encyclopedia by Jennifer Lawlerand interview with Devin Willis)

Kenpo is a mixture of five cultures (in historical order): Chinese, Japanese, Okinawan, Hawaiian (before Hawaii became a state) and American.

The word Kenpo is Japanese for “Fist Law” (Ken/fist, Po/Law) which in itself is confusing for this art started in China. Most people have heard of “Chinese Kenpo” or “American Kenpo.” But Japanese? (For point of reference “Fist Law” in Chinese is CH’UAN FA.)

The name is the result of centuries of development and change. Despite it’s birth in China, the art of “Kenpo” was passed down through the Mitose family who studied the original art in China in the 1600’s and brought it back to Japan. The Mitose family were Japanese, so, naturally they used Japanese to describe their family system.

James M. Mitose moved from Japan to Hawaii and the style he taught there was called “Kenpo Jiu-Jitsu” (He wrote a book in 1953 called: “What is Self Defense? (Kenpo Jiu Jitsu).

James Mitose’s second Shodan was William Chow. In 1949 Chow opened his own Kenpo club and he used the term “Kenpo Karate” to try and distinguish his system from “Kenpo Jiu Jitsu.”

In the early 1950’s Ed Parker (who was a Judo Shodan) started to take Kenpo Karate lessons with W. Chow. In 1956 Ed Parker moved to Pasadena, California where he opened his own Kenpo Karate school. Ed parker would later become the foremost pioneer of Kenpo to the American mainland. Ed Parker’s 5th and 6th black belts were Al and Jim Tracy.

Through the years of 1956-1960, Parker’s system of Kenpo was called “Original Kenpo” because it was identical to that Mitose and Chow taught. (Parker called his system simply, “Kenpo Karate.”) In 1961, Ed parker and Chinese Gung Fu Master, James Wing Woo co-founded, “Traditional Kenpo.”

So, Kenpo has had a lot added to it over the centuries. Please don’t take this short summary as a suggestion that Kenpo is not a “set” art. On the contrary, after so many years of development the Kenpo system knows what does and doesn’t work, because of the fact that the style has been handed down from one generation to another for hundreds of years. (They have had a lot of practice.)

Many people call Kenpo the “ultimate in self defense.” Kenpo training emphasizes a scientific approach to combat. Kenpo disables an attacker with quick, efficient techniques. Kenpo has a counter for every kind of grab, punch, strike, charge or push. The counters range from simple escapes to joint locks, brakes, blocks, strikes and joint and nerve strikes. From Gecko K Martial Arts

from http://www.usadojo.com

Shootfighting
The History of Shootfighting

Shootfighting might be the most all round martial art the world has ever seen. The best styles of the world have contributed with their specialties. Stand up fight from muay thai, clinch and take downs from judo and Wrestling and from sambo and ju-jutsu the ground fight. Stand up fight and ground fight is equally emphasized. There is always something new to learn as a result of the versatility. Since you can specialize on the training that suits you, it never becomes boring.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, among other styles, has during the recent years showed the importance of well working skills in grappling. However, the stand up fight can not be left in the background. Shootfighting is the style that combines stand up fight, clinch and ground fight the best. It has become a success. Fighters who train according to the shootfighting concept dominates within the NHB. Here you can find fighters as Bas Rutten, Frank Shamrock, Randy Couture, Maurice Smith and others.

Shootfighting was created when a German wrestler, Karl Gotch, was teaching “real Wrestling” or “shooting” to a group of Japanese elite fighters. Two of the fighters, Masami Soronaka (karate, judo and sumo) and Yoshiaki Fujiwara (muay thai/kickboxing and judo) created what was called UWF or “hard style” in Japan. Fights have been arranged during more than 10 years.

Bart Vale took the style to the west. He was the first champion who was not Japanese. Bart was also the person who came up with the term Shootfighting.

Shootfighting became well-known all over the world through UFC and other NHB arrangements. It is the third most popular “audience sport” in Japan and is continuing to grow fast.

It is important to emphasize that Shootfighting unlike UFC etc. is a sport with certain limits. This is to protect the fighters and improve the quality of the techniques.

from http://www.shootersshootfighting.com

Muay Thai
Muay Thai is the martial art of fighting with one’s bare fists, utilizing elbows, knees, feet and fists as weapons. No one knows when Muay Thai first began, it is assumed that Muay Thai had been practiced since the beginning of Thai history.

In the old days, Asian men of Mongolian descent from China down to the Malaya peninsular fought their wars face to face, fist to fist, unlike their Caucasian counterparts in Europe, who concentrated on developing weapons with which to fight. For this reason personal capabilities played a major role in the art of fighting and an efficient martial art was extremely important. Muay Thai is one of the most efficient martial arts.

Since modern technology did not exist in ancient times, Thai children did not have mechanical toys to play with. Instead, they used their bodies to play games. Those simple games served as basic exercises for Muay Thai. They made parts of the bodies ready.

Muay Thai involves all parts of the body. The students of Muay Thai learn about the body’s weak points and understood how to exercise one’s physical parts.

‘Nawa-attawut’ or the 9 principal weapons in Muay Thai include head, two fists, two elbows, two knees, and two feet. In addition, there are combination weapons which are two shoulders, arms, bottom and the outer parts of the ankles: The practice of using both the principal weapons and the combination weapons in Muay Thai requires not only hard work, but the proper steps and great endurance.

The training involves rigorous physical training, similar to that practiced by Western boxers. It includes running, shadow-boxing, and heavy bag work. Much emphasis is also placed on various drills with the so-called “Thai pads”. These pads weigh five to ten pounds, and cover the wearers forearms. In use, the trainer wears the pads, and may hold them to receive kicks, punches, and knee and elbow strikes, and may also use them to punch at the trainee. This training is vaguely similar to the way boxing trainers use focus mitts. The characteristic Muay Thai round kick is delivered with the shin, therefore, shin conditioning is also done.

Little or no free-sparring is done in training, due to the devastating nature of the techniques employed. Thai boxers may box, hands only, with ordinary boxing gloves. Another training drill is for two fighters to clinch, and practice a form of stand-up grappling, the goal of which is to try to land a knee strike. However, full-contact kicks, knees, and elbows are typically not used in training.

from http://www.usadojo.com

Aikido
Aikido is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba (often referred to by his title ‘O Sensei’ or ‘Great Teacher’). On a purely physical level it is an art involving some throws and joint locks that are derived from Jujitsu and some throws and other techniques derived from Kenjutsu. Aikido focuses not on punching or kicking opponents, but rather on using their own energy to gain control of them or to throw them away from you. It is not a static art, but places great emphasis on motion and the dynamics of movement.

Upon closer examination, practitioners will find from Aikido what they are looking for, whether it is applicable self-defense technique, spiritual enlightenment, physical health or peace of mind. O Sensei emphasized the moral and spiritual aspects of this art, placing great weight on the development of harmony and peace. “The Way of Harmony of the Spirit” is one way that “Aikido” may be translated into English. This is still true of Aikido today, although different styles emphasize the more spiritual aspects to greater or lesser degrees. Although the idea of a martial discipline striving for peace and harmony may seem paradoxical, it is the most basic tenet of the art.

May 3, 2007 Posted by | david lee, devin willis, ed parker, systems used | 8 Comments

History of Modern kung fu

In San Jose, California during the early 1970s a method of combat by the name of Modern Kung Fu which also means “New Hard Task” or “New Work”. The founder name was Master David Lee.

Master Lee had studied many different systems of martial arts in China starting as a very young boy. Some were Pa kua chang, China’s wrestling, Shaolin (martial arts) Hung Gar, Monkey, Eagle Claw, Crane, Drunken Monkey, Tiger, Mantis.

The Main goal in MKF as in most styles of martial arts is to become a better human being. MKF is for defense of different zones, 1-5 the Modern Kung-Fu community utilizes the following breakdown grappling range, trapping range, punching range, and kicking range. Names are merely labels, though. In punching range, you can punch if you would like, or you might do anything else (such as an eye-strike) that would work efficiently within that range. The number of categories that is used is also optional.

In MKF, is known for its ability to adapt to different attacks and defense. The goal of a student is that he/she can defend themselves from any position. This system does not believe in any set techniques, instead it holds to studying movement of the human body.

In the 1990s MKF has added many more theories and movements from other systems. The Don Willis system of boxing, koga system (defensive tactics), Kenpo. They also focus on Muay Thai, Modified Freestlye submission and Greco-Roman wrestling. The interesting thing about MKF is it continues to grow for the future (Willis Modern Combatives). Instructors are always learning and growing with other arts and teachers. This keeps the system from going stale and outdated. An example of the Willis Modern Combative’s theory and ideas are alive, one only needs to visit a gym owned by Damon Willis, Who is well versed in MKF and Willis Modern Combatives and is an Muay Thai Assistant Instructor under Master Toddy.

He was also taught by his brother Devin Willis, who has his instructors ranking in MKF and Willis Modern Combatives . Devin has been training in the martial arts since he was eight years old and has followed that path for over thirty years. He has taught nureous students over the years ncluding law enforcement, military personal

Both Willis are always trying to grow and are currently studying one area they are interested in Walt Bayless Jiu-Jitsu and more Muay Thai.

==References==

  • Oral History of Modern Kung Fu – David Lee interview 1979
  • Modern Kung Fu- understanding true combative applications by Devin Willis (unpublished manuscript)
  • Reading And Critical Thinking Book -1 Donald L. Barnes – This book has a great section on the roots of Kung Fu

May 2, 2007 Posted by | History of Modern kung fu | 1 Comment